Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Naura Tertawa Dan Menari Bahagia


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Sunday, July 5, 2020

What Are Childhood Mental Disorders?

Mental health in childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones, and learning healthy social skills and how to cope when there are problems. Mentally healthy children have a positive quality of life and can function well at home, in school, and in their communities. This website provides information about children’s mental healthLearn more about specific child mental health conditions, treatments, prevention, and public health research on children’s mental health.


Mental disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Many children occasionally have problems like fears and worries, or disruptive behaviors. If symptoms are severe and persistent, and interfere with school, home, or play activities, the child may be diagnosed with a mental disorder.

Among the more common mental disorders that can be diagnosed in childhood are attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, and behavior disorders.
Other childhood disorders and concerns that affect how children learn, behave, or handle their emotions can include learning and developmental disabilities, autism, and risk factors like substance use and self-harm.

Bone Soup (Sup Tulang)

Thick soup. Can be served with garlic bread in place of stew or mushroom soup. Adjust ingredients according to the amount of the meat/soup bone



  1. Step 1
  2. 2 kg Soup Bone (see pic)
  3. Enough water to boil the meat
  4. 4 Star Anise
  5. 4 Cardamoms
  6. 4 Cinnamon Sticks
  7. 2-3 tbsp Kurma powder (see pic)
  8. 1 tbsp turmeric powder
  9. 2 big brown/yellow onion
  10. 4 garlic
  11. 2 " ginger
  12. 1 big green chilli
  13. 5 bird eyes chillies (more for extra punch)
  14. 1 tbsp Pepper (finely crushed using mortar & pestle)
  15. 2 sticks carrot - cut
  16. 3 big potatoes - cut into cubes
  17. 1 tbsp rice flour/corn flour
  18. To taste - Chicken Seasoning powder
  19. To taste - salt

07 Just Stay Home Japanese Recipes Everyone Can Make

For pantry-led and creative cooking, here are  easy Japanese recipes you can make at home anytime. You’ll also find quick tips and resources on how to make the best of your pantry meals.



Pantry meals exist for a good reason. Whether you’re a home cook or a college student, there will be times when we find ourselves relying on pantry items to cook up lunch or dinner.

In my kitchen, I always make sure I have staples such as rice, dried noodles, tofu, eggs, and frozen vegetables. Not only they are convenient, they really can save the day when I need to feed my hungry family in an unexpected situation. Bonus points: cooking at home is always so much better than taking out. We save a lot of money, time and essentially eating healthier.


In this pantry meal guide, you’ll find easy Japanese recipes that are pantry-friendly, along with tips, ideas, and resources on maximizing pantry staples.



Staying at home? No problem. These recipes will empower you to eat well and nutritiously anytime!

Zosui (Japanese Rice Soup)

Zosui is a comforting Japanese rice soup that works beautifully with pantry-ready ingredients like ready-cooked rice, eggs, and leftover ingredients. The easy template is flexible, yet you’re guaranteed a nourishing meal at the end of the day.

Substitutions: Use fish (salmon, cod), tofu, or other protein if you don’t have chicken. No shiitake mushrooms? Don’t worry, any mushrooms are fine, or just skip them. This is a very flexible recipe. I think non-Japanese rice works for this recipe (I never tried it but Jasmine rice or any long-grain rice is ok!)
Variations:

Classic Fried Rice

I believe fried rice was created out of necessity. It is indeed the most convenient and comforting meal that turns leftovers into something so delicious! You can whip up this classic Fried Rice under 20 minutes.

Substitutions: I used ham, egg and green onion in the recipe, but you can easily use bacon, frozen edamame, crab sticks, green peas or whatever you have in the fridge.
Variations:

Children's Mental Health Research

CDC and partner agencies are working to understand the prevalence of mental disorders in children and how they impact their lives. Currently, it is not known exactly how many children have any mental disorder, or how often different disorders occur together, because no national dataset is available that looks at all mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders together.

Research on prevalence
Using different data sources
Healthcare providers, public health researchers, educators, and policy makers can get information about the prevalence of children’s mental health disorders from a variety of sources. Data sources, such as national surveys, community-based studies, and administrative claims data (like healthcare insurance claims), use different study methods and provide different types of information, each with advantages and disadvantages. Advantages and disadvantages for different data sources include the following:
  • National surveys have large sample sizes that are needed to create estimates at the national and state levels. However, they also generally use a parent’s report of the child’s diagnosis, which means that the healthcare provider has to give an accurate diagnosis and the parent has to accurately remember what it was.
  • Community-based studies offer the opportunity to observe children’s symptoms, which means that even children who have not been diagnosed or do not have the right diagnosis could be found. However, these studies are typically done in small geographic areas, so findings are not necessarily the same in other communities.
  • Administrative claims are typically very large datasets with information on diagnosis and treatment directly from the providers, which allows tracking changes over time. Because they are recorded for billing purposes, diagnoses or services that would not be reimbursed from the specific health insurance might not be recorded in the data.
Using different sources of data together provides more information because it is possible to describe the following:
  • Children with a diagnosed condition compared to children who have the same symptoms, but are not diagnosed
  • Differences between populations with or without health insurance
  • How estimates for mental health disorders change over time
Knowledge on the prevalence of mental disorders among children informs the work of many health care providers, public health researchers, educators, and policy makers, and any single data source and study methodology can provide valuable insight. However, it is only after prevalence estimates from complementary studies are considered together that distinctions can be made to more deeply inform an assessment of community needs, including diagnosed prevalence versus underlying prevalence, differences between insured and uninsured populations, and how estimates change over time. National surveys, community-based studies, and administrative claims data each provide a different type of information that builds broad understanding. This article presents some of the overarching complexities of the issue, discusses strengths and weaknesses of some common data sources and methodologies used to generate epidemiological estimates, and describes ways in which these data sources complement one another and contribute to a better understanding of the prevalence of pediatric mental disorders.